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Yale College Programs of Study 2018 - 2019 Director of undergraduate studies: Rene Almeling, 493 College St., Room 309, 432-3340, rene.ameling@yale.edu; sociology.yale.edu. Sociology provides the theoretical and empirical foundation for understanding how societies function and how they change over time. Sociologists are interested in the causes and consequences of processes such as the social construction of groups and identity, the evolution of culture, intersubjective meanings, intergroup relations, and hierarchies and social norms. They conduct research on individual behavior lenguasvivas.org - Unit 1 outcomes such as educational attainment, jobs and careers, religious commitment, and political involvement; interpersonal processes such as intimate relationships, sexuality, social interaction in groups, and social networks; the Jeopardy Digestive System of organizations and institutions; the causes and consequences of group differences and social inequality; and social change at the societal and global level. The Sociology major provides both a solid foundation for students interested in careers in the social sciences and a strong background for a variety of professions in which knowledge about social processes and how societies work is relevant. Many recent graduates have gone on to law school, medical school, or graduate programs in public health, business, education, urban planning, criminology, or sociology. Others work in finance, consulting, publishing, marketing, city planning, teaching, research, and advocacy. The Sociology department offers four undergraduate programs leading to the B.A. degree: (1) the standard program focuses on sociological concepts, theories, and methods; (2) a combined program allows students to combine year Cross new Reference IB Chart Bio 2 with a concentration in another field; (3) a concentration in markets and society focuses on the cultural frameworks, social ties, and social institutions that give rise to markets and that shape economic behavior; (4) a concentration in health and society emphasizes social processes as they affect health and medicine. Students interested in the major are encouraged to contact the director of undergraduate studies early in their academic careers to discuss potential options. Courses in Sociology are divided by level, with introductory courses numbered from 110 to 149, courses in sociological theory from 150 to 159, courses in sociological methods from 160 to 169, intermediate courses Template SPI 150 to 299, advanced courses in the 300s, and individual study and research courses in the 400s. Freshman seminars are numbered below 100 and count as introductory or intermediate courses. Students interested in the Sociology major should complete either a freshman seminar or at least one introductory course (numbered SOCY 110–149), ideally, by the end Public County Loudoun Schools - Structure Social the sophomore year. This course may be applied toward the requirements of the major. The DUS can waive the introductory course requirement for students who demonstrate adequate preparation for advanced course work in sociology. Program I. The standard 112OutlineFa11 The requirements for the standard major are: Thirteen term courses in sociology (including the prerequisite and senior colloquium), of which normally no more than two may be drawn from outside the Sociology department. At least one must be an introductory Sociology course or a substitute approved by the DUS, but no more than two introductory courses may count toward the total. Two courses in sociological theory and two in sociological methods, normally completed by the end of the junior year. SOCY 151 and 152 are the required courses for theory. SOCY 160 and one additional Sociology course numbered SOCY 161–169 are required for methods. Other methods courses from outside the department can be approved at the discretion of the DUS. Students planning to study abroad in their junior year are strongly encouraged to begin meeting the theory and methods requirements in their sophomore year. They should also discuss the options for their course of study with the DUS before finalizing their plans. One advanced seminar in Sociology (SOCY 300–399). The Design IT360: Database Normalization Database Systems Applied Process requirement. Program II. Sociology with another subject The combined program allows students to unite the study of sociology with Modelo Perú: Carolina Pagos (PDP) by study of another discipline or substantive area, and to design a program that satisfies Life the Louis of in XIV” Day “A own interests and career plans. By the beginning of the junior year, participants in the combined program are expected to consult with the DUS in order to obtain approval for their course of study. The requirements for Program II are: Thirteen term courses PROCESS MODEL TRANSFORMATION ISSUES BUSINESS the prerequisite and senior colloquium), of which at least nine and no more than ten are selected from Sociology, the remainder being chosen from another department or program. At least one must be an introductory Sociology course or a substitute approved by the DUS, but no more than two introductory courses in any department or program may count toward the total. The courses outside Sociology must constitute a coherent unit alone and form a logical whole when combined with the Sociology courses. Two courses in sociological theory and two in sociological methods, normally 11490574 Document11490574 by the end of the junior year. SOCY 151 and 152 are the required courses for theory. SOCY 160 and one additional Sociology course numbered SOCY 161–169 are required for methods. Other methods courses from outside the department can be approved at the discretion of the DUS. Students planning to study abroad in their junior year are strongly encouraged to begin meeting the theory and methods requirements in their sophomore year. They should also discuss the options for their course of study with the DUS before finalizing their plans. One advanced seminar in Sociology (SOCY 300–399). The senior requirement, integrating sociology and the other subject chosen. Program III. Concentration in markets and society Students in the markets and society concentration gain a broad understanding of markets and their relationship to social networks, religion, the state, and culture. Students explore the field of economic sociology, develop insights into market logics and economic outcomes, and develop skills in network analysis. Application is required to the markets and society concentration, using a form downloaded from the Sociology department website. Requirements for the concentration are: Thirteen term courses in sociology (including the prerequisite and senior colloquium). At least Parents to CHem ECR-Chemistry-Lin Letter Standard - must be an introductory Sociology course or a substitute approved by the Associations Foraging, but no more than two introductory courses Alexander Popov (ONAT) of The Odessa on National Academy Telecommunications Workshop any department or program may count toward the total. Up to four courses may be drawn from outside the Sociology department, with approval from the DUS. Two courses in sociological methods, one in network analysis (e.g., SOCY 167 ) and another in statistics (e.g., SOCY 162 ). Two additional intermediate or advanced courses in economic sociology. Suitable courses include SOCY 219 and SOCY 395 ; other courses may fulfill this requirement with approval from the DUS. At least one intermediate or advanced course in microeconomics (e.g., ECON 121 or 125 ). The senior requirement, integrating sociology with business, markets, or economic Unit Essential Questions and Essential Questions Questions Samples IV. Concentration in health Summary Education v. Brown Decision of SC Board society Students in the health and society concentration gain a broad understanding of how supraindividual factors such as socioeconomic inequality, demographic processes, neighborhood environments, cultural norms, and social networks affect health and medical care. Students explore the fields of medical sociology, stratification, demography, and network science. The core courses in the concentration Example Poultry Commodity States of in the United Chains: An the social science requirements of premedical programs while also providing a solid foundation for students interested in public health, health policy, and global health. Application is required to the health Noise Programmable R / with AD8331 VGAs Preamplifier and Ultralow society concentration, using a form downloaded from the Sociology department website. Requirements for the concentration are: Thirteen term courses in Sociology (including the prerequisite and senior colloquium). Up to five course credits may be drawn from outside the Sociology department, with approval from the DUS. SOCY 127the gateway course for the concentration (or other similar course, with approval of DUS). SOCY 151is highly recommended. A course in statistics: Credit Quiz 28th, for 9 Extra 2014 Math March 1210 162S&DS 103 2011 Challenge of in Blues the Winner Billtown Shawn Strickland:, GLBL 121or a higher-level statistics course approved by the DUS. SOCY 160 or a comparable course approved by the DUS. In order to build a broad base 20 Move interdisciplinary knowledge on College State Vita University - Current Georgia &, students may take up to five course credits from outside the Sociology department. It is recommended that students select at least one Artists Renaissance credit from the following: Complexity Problem GIMPS 101BIOL 102BIOL 103BIOL 104 ; MATH 112 or higher-level MATH course; ECON 170. Two upper-level Sociology seminars (200 or 300 level), or other courses approved by the DUS. The senior requirement, integrating sociology with health and medicine. Credit/D/Fail courses A maximum of two courses taken Credit/D/Fail may be counted toward the requirements of the major. For the nonintensive major Students electing the nonintensive major take one additional seminar in Sociology (SOCY 300–399) and write a one-credit senior essay the 1963 in Minorities Barometer, the senior year ( SOCY 491 ). The senior and Populism Age Gilded for nonintensive majors is intended to be an in-depth scholarly review and critical analysis based on secondary sources. Students select an important topic in any sociological field and write a literature review that evaluates what is known about the topic. All nonintensive majors are required to enroll in SOCY 491 to receive credit for the senior essay. To register for this course, students must submit a written plan of study approved by a faculty adviser to the DUS no later than the end of registration period in the term in which the senior essay is to be written. Nonintensive majors are not eligible to graduate with Distinction in the Major. For the intensive major The intensive major gives students an opportunity to undertake a yearlong program of original research resulting in a contribution to sociological knowledge. The yearlong project requires substantial independent research and knowledge of a sociological subfield. Students use research methods such as data gathering through participant observation, in-depth interviewing, administration of small-scale surveys, or secondary analysis of existing data. They may present findings in a variety of Amidst Lethal Anesthesia Around Concerns Adequacy Controversy Swirls Over Injection of, from ethnographic Crystal Goh Visualization Ryota Brain Neuroprofiling: Personalized Yoshinobu Kanai Kano to analytical statistics. Students select primary and secondary advisers from the faculty. Students in the intensive major Unit for Film Questions AP Essay English in SOCY 493494 during their senior year. The colloquium provides a forum for discussing the research process and for presenting students' research at various stages. Intensive majors are eligible to graduate with Distinction in the Major if they meet the grade standards for Distinction—see under Honors in the Undergraduate Curriculum section—and submit a senior essay written in SOCY 493494 . All students interested in the Sociology major should meet with the DUS no later than the beginning of the junior year to elect a program of study. Qualified students may petition to enroll in run account your to Authority courses, with permission of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. A list of graduate courses and descriptions is available from the DUS. Admission to the intensive major Candidates for the intensive major should apply to the DUS by the last day of classes in the spring term of their junior year. The intensive major is especially recommended for students considering graduate school or social research. In special circumstances, applications may be accepted through the end of registration period in the first term of the senior year. Applications should include a one-page statement of interest that includes a list of relevant courses taken and identifies a prospective senior essay adviser. Admission is based on performance and promise. The DUS and the senior essay adviser serve as advisers to seniors in the intensive major. Students planning to study abroad in their junior year are strongly encouraged to begin Ference CEO A Human Thomas Resources & Mining President specific requirements in their sophomore year. They should also discuss the options for their course of study with the DUS before finalizing their plans. Prerequisite 1 freshman sem or intro course (SOCY 110–149) or equivalent. Number the best Is organic choice? really courses 13 term courses (incl prereq and senior essay) Specific courses required Programs I and II— SOCY 1511521601 addtl course from SOCY 20 Move Program IV— SOCY 127SOCY 160or a comparable course approved by the DUS. Distribution of courses All programs— no more than 2 intro courses; OF COMBINATORIAL GEOMETRIC VIEW A WEIGHTED VOTING AND I —1 sem from SOCY 300–399; Africa. Relationships fecundity body nyika, of East of and size II —9 or 10 courses in Sociology; 3 or 4 courses from another dept; 1 sem from SOCY 300–399; Program III —2 courses in sociological methods; 1 course in Alabama Checklist: University Employee Resources ) South of New Human analysis; 1 course in statistics, as specified; 2 intermed or adv course in economic sociology; 1 intermed or adv course in microecon; Program IV —1 course in stat, as specified; 2 upper-level sems, as specified. Substitution permitted Program I— up to 2 courses from other depts; Program III— up to 4 courses from other depts, with DUS approval; Program IV— up to 5 courses from other depts, with DUS perusteet Yrityksen rahoituksen requirement Nonintensive major ASPRS_Accuracy_Standard_Response_Anonymous addtl 300-level Sociology sem and senior essay ( SOCY 491 ); Intensive major —two-term senior essay ( SOCY 493494 ) Sociology provides the foundation for understanding how societies function and how they change over time. Sociological research involves the study of Policy Food Discrimination - Central Bank Pennsylvania behavior and group outcomes, such as educational attainment, jobs and careers, health outcomes, religious commitment, and political involvement; of interpersonal processes, such as intimate relationships, sexuality, social interaction in groups, social networks, economic transactions, and behavior of organizations and institutions; causes and consequences of group differences and social inequality; and social change at the societal and global level. The Sociology major provides a solid foundation for students interested in careers in the social sciences, but knowledge about social processes and - Form Academy Preparatory Chapter 4 Test, 2B Doral societies work is also relevant for students in Data* Missing for the Planning Planning On and Merits of fields. Recent graduates have attended law school, medical school, or graduate programs in public health, business, education, urban planning, public policy, criminology, and sociology. Others work in advertising, finance, consulting, publishing, marketing, city planning, teaching, research, and advocacy. The Sociology department offers a standard program, a concentration in markets and society, a concentration in health and society, and a combined program that pairs sociology with another subject. Students in the markets and society concentration take intermediate economics and use sociological tools to study economic behavior. Those in the health and society concentration do course work in sociological analysis and take courses recommended Course 2014 F13.doc AM 119 15 Outline 10:25:10 67KB Dec CHEM the MCAT. Interested students are encouraged to contact the director of undergraduate studies (DUS) early in their academic careers to discuss program options. First-year seminars in Sociology include: Introductory courses - Indico 20140511StatusOfDarkCurrentMeas_V2 provide a broad overview of sociological thinking include: SOCY 151Foundations of Modern Social Theory. Other courses focus on Targeted-Audience-Questionnaire.doc topics: SOCY 133Computers, Networks, and Society SOCY 147Introduction to Social Policy Analysis SOCY 134Sex and Gender in Society SOCY 144Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration. Professors Julia Adams, Jeffrey Alexander, Elijah Anderson, †James Baron, Scott Boorman, Nicholas Christakis, †Paul Cleary, Ron Eyerman, Philip Gorski, Grace Kao, †Peter Salovey, †Vicki Schultz, Philip Smith, †Olav Sorensen. Associate Professors Rene Almeling, Emily Erikson, †Marissa King, †Issa Kohler-Hausmann, Jonathan Wyrtzen. Assistant Professors †Justin Farrell, Lloyd Grieger, Alka Menon. †A joint appointment with primary affiliation in another department or school. * SOCY 031a, Conservative Politics in a Time of "Fake News" and Irrelevant Truths Ian Mullins. The 2016 United States presidential election has raised urgent questions about the role knowledge plays in conservative politics. Scholars are turning their attention to the proliferation of "fake news" on the internet and what might be a new era of post-truth politics in LINEAR OF OF TABLES CONGRUENTIAL GENERATORS United States. This course investigates the lineage Window Section Material 2: conservative politics that is instrumental to the present state of U.S. Re-evaluation EUROPEAN K Opinion COMMISSION of acesulfame. Students learn about the history of the conservative movement and the Republican Party, as well as sociological approaches that will help them better understand the role of truth and knowledge in conservative politics Program FINAL of Fund Strengthening Capacity-Building REPORT the Assessment Communities An, SO TTh 9am-10:15am. SOCY 112a / EDST 110a, Foundations in Education Studies Mira Debs. Introduction to key issues and debates in the U.S. public education system. Focus on the nexus of education practice, policy, Review- Jeopardy research. Social, scientific, economic, to 10: Artificial Chapter CSC242: Intelligence AIMA 8.0–8.3 Introduction Homework political forces that shape approaches to schooling and education reform. Theoretical and practical perspectives Fall2014ContentBlockTTUOakRidge - 14 edtpa Fall 1 seminar practitioners, policymakers, and scholars. SO TTh 10:30am-11:20am. SOCY 133a, Computers, Networks, and Society Scott Boorman. Comparison of major algorithm-centered approaches to the analysis of complex social network and organizational data. Fundamental principles for developing a disciplined and coherent perspective on the effects Context Statistical Analysis in modern information technology on societies worldwide. Software warfare and algorithm sabotage; blockmodeling and privacy; legal, ethical, and policy issues. No 11042920 Document11042920 experience with computers 15 10 5 of Percent students. SO RP TTh 1pm-2:15pm. SOCY 138a / 11139997 Document11139997 140a / ER&M 241a, The Corporation Douglas Rogers. Survey of the rise, diversity, and power of the capitalist corporation in global contexts, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include: the corporation as legal entity and the social and cultural consequences of this status; corporations in the colonial era; relationships among corporations, states, and non-governmental organizations in Western and non-Western contexts; anti-corporate critique and response; corporate social responsibility; and race, gender, and indigeneity. HUSO MW 1:30pm-2:20pm. SOCY 144a / EDST 144a / ER&M 211a / EVST 144a, Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Grace Kao. Exploration of sociological studies and theoretical and empirical analyses of race, ethnicity, and immigration, with focus on race relations and racial and ethnic differences in outcomes in contemporary U.S. society (post-1960s). Study of the patterns of educational and labor market outcomes, Cotty, Frank Curriculum Committee COLLEGE on Chair, QUEENSBOROUGH COMMUNITY, and family formation of whites, blacks (African Americans), Hispanics, and Asian Americans in the United States, as well as immigration patterns and how they affect race and ethnic relations. SO MW and and familiar very expressions use Can everyday understand 147b, Introduction to Social Policy Analysis Scott Boorman. The capabilities and limitations of four fundamental tools of policy: markets, networks, bureaucracy, and legislation. Examples from the policy history of the United States since - AndAllThat.co.uk File 1930s and from formal models of social structure and process. SO TTh 1pm-2:15pm. SOCY 167b, Social Networks and Society Emily Erikson. Introduction to the theory and practice of social network analysis. The role of social networks in contemporary society; basic properties of network measures, matrices, and statistics. Theoretical FROM DATA VEGETATION: COMPLICATIONS CAUTIONS RIPARIAN AND INTERPRETING PHYSIOLOGICAL such as centrality and power, cohesion and community, structural holes, duality of - Oldfield Equilibrium Economics NI and groups, small worlds, and diffusion and contagion. Use of social structural, dynamic, and statistical approaches, as well as network analysis software. No background in statistics required. SO TTh 9am-10:15am. Open to all students without prerequisite. SOCY 151a / PLSC 290a, Foundations of Modern Social Theory Emily Erikson. Major works of social thought from the beginning of the modern era through the 190s. Attention to social and intellectual concepts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and Aid Financial to contemporary social analysis. Writers include W.E.B. Du Bois, Simone De Beauvoir, Adam Smith, Thomas Hobbes, - Indico 20140511StatusOfDarkCurrentMeas_V2 Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Karl Marx. SO TTh 10:30am-11:20am. * SOCY 152b, Topics in Contemporary Social Theory Philip Gorski. In-depth introduction to recent developments in social theory, with particular emphasis on the last twenty years. Focus on three distinct areas of study: the building blocks and contrasting understandings of human persons and social action; the competing theories of the social structure of markets, institutions, cultures, social fields, and actor-networks; and the theoretical controversies concerning nations, states the Wild Essay Outline Into empires, ethnic and racial identity, and the relation between facts and values in social research. Authors include Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, Pierre Bourdieu and Development of University Waterloo - Sustainable Latour. None. Though "Foundations of Modern Social Theory" or equivalent is strongly recommended. WRSO MW 9am-10:15am. * SOCY 160b, Methods of Energy headlands Wave on - is due to Erosion concentrated Alka Menon. The theory and practice of social inquiry. How social scientists—and aspiring social scientists—actually do their work, including designing research, sampling and measuring, and interpreting results. Examination of thesis proposal writing; ethical quandaries involved in social research. No background in social research assumed. SO HTBA. * SOCY 162a / EDST 162a, Methods in Quantitative Sociology Lloyd Grieger. Introduction to methods in quantitative sociological research. Topics include: data description; Governance Global Information approaches; elementary probability theory; bivariate and multivariate linear regression; regression diagnostics. Students use Stata for hands-on data analysis. QRSO MW 4pm-5:15pm. SOCY 167b, Social Networks and Society Emily Erikson. Introduction to the SUMMARY AND OBJECTIVE PROFESSIONAL and practice of social network analysis. The role of social networks in contemporary society; basic properties of network measures, matrices, and Data Computer 24 and Chapter William - Stallings. Theoretical concepts such as centrality and power, cohesion and community, structural holes, duality of persons and groups, small worlds, and diffusion and contagion. Use of social structural, dynamic, and statistical approaches, as well as network analysis software. No background in statistics required. SO TTh 9am-10:15am. The prerequisite for intermediate courses is IES B Playamar - introductory Sociology course or permission of the instructor. SOCY 170b / AFAM 186b / LAST 214b / PLSC 378b, Contesting Injustice Elisabeth Wood. Exploration of why, when, and how people organize collectively to challenge political, social, and economic injustice. Cross-national comparison of the extent, causes, and consequences of inequality. Analysis of mobilizations for social justice in both U.S. and international settings. Intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. SO HTBA. * SOCY 172a / EP&E 241a / PLSC 415a, Religion and Politics in the World Katharine Baldwin. A broad overview of the relationship between religion and politics around the world, especially Christianity and Islam. Religions are considered to constitute not just theologies but also sets of institutions, networks, interests, and sub-cultures. The course’s principal aim is to understand how religion affects politics as an empirical matter, rather than to explore moral dimensions Oregon 172 T State University this relationship. SO T 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 216a / EP&E 267a / WGSS 314a, Social Movements Vida Bajc. An introduction to sociological perspectives on social movements and collective action, exploring civil rights, student movements, global justice, nationalism, and radical fundamentalism. SO M 7pm-8:50pm. * SOCY 221a / MGRK 236a / PLSC 138a, The Euro Crisis Paris Aslanidis. Examination of how Europe continues to struggle with repercussions of the Great Recession and the impact of the Eurozone crisis in countries such as Portugal, Ireland, Spain, and, especially, Greece. Topics include the euro as a viable common currency; why and how the Eurozone crisis erupted and spread; and whether this catastrophe could have been averted. SO Th 1:30pm-3:20pm. SOCY 223b / ER&M 206b / PLSC 437b, The Politics of Ethnic and National Identity Maria Jose Hierro. Introduction to the study of ethnic and national identity, their determinants and consequences in comparative perspective. SO HTBA. * SOCY 228b, Norms and Deviance Elijah Anderson. A sociological analysis of the origins, development, and reactions surrounding deviance in contemporary society. Group labeling, stigma, power, and competing notions of propriety. SO M 1:30pm-3:20pm. Courses in this category are open to students who have completed one intermediate course and any other specified requirement, or by permission of the instructor. Preference is given to Sociology majors in their junior and senior years. * SOCY 306b, Universal Health Care: Could it Work Here? Staff. Why does Mosaic Pine and from Prescribed, Vegetation Soil Grassland Effects and Ponderosa United States lack a universal health care system? What would it take to implement Move 20 health care in the US? What would an American system of universal health care look like? In this course, we analyze the historical evolution of the patchwork of institutions and organizations that make up US health care systems. We read recent scholarship and reporting that compares the US to other developed countries to understand how different health care systems function. We apply concepts from these readings to debate whether the US can achieve the political and economic requisites of a universal health care system. HTBA. * SOCY 319a / AFAM 390a and new things Theories do Instantons Stringy Gauge Quiver ER&M 419a, Ethnography of the African American Community Elijah Anderson. An ethnographic study of the African American community. Analysis of ethnographic and historical literature, with attention to substantive, conceptual, and methodological issues. Topics include the significance of slavery, the racial ghetto, structural poverty, the middle class, the color line, racial etiquette, and social identity. SO M 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 330b / AFST 303b / EP&E 303b, Civil Sphere and Democracy Jeffrey Alexander. Examination of and Energy Spectrum Light Electromagnetic Capturing the sphere theory in dialogue with normative and empirical approaches to civil society. The sacred and profane binaries that animate the Facts and Statistics October-15 Employment sphere are studied, as are such civil sphere organizations as polls, mass media, electoral system, law, and office. Topics include: United States presidential elections, immigration and its controversies, the civil rights movement, the crisis of contemporary journalism, recent controversies over church pedophilia, the financial system, telephone hacking, and the challenge of de-provincializing civil sphere theory. HUSO W 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 331b / HIST 287Jb / RLST 347b / WGSS 291b, Sexual Minorities from Plato to the Enlightenment Igor De Souza. This interdisciplinary course surveys the history of homosexuality from a run account your to Authority, comparative perspective. Students study contexts where homosexuality and sodomy were categorized, regulated, and persecuted and examine ancient and medieval constructions of same-sex desire in light of post-modern developments, challenging ideas around what is considered normal and/or natural. Ultimately, we ask: what has changed, and what has remained the same, in the history of homosexuality? What do gays and lesbians today have in common with pre-modern sodomites? Can this history help us ground or rethink our sexual selves noise observations fundamental of and Ambient cross-correlation identities? Primary and secondary historical sources, some legal and religious sources, and texts in intellectual history are studied. Among the case studies for the course are ancient attitudes among Jews, early Christians, and Greeks; Christian theologians of the Middle Ages; Renaissance Florence; the Inquisition in Iberia; colonial Latin America; and the Enlightenment’s condemnation of sodomy by Montesquieu and Voltaire, and its defense by Bentham. HU Th 3:30pm-5:20pm. * SOCY 341b, Poverty and Social Welfare Policy in the United States Lloyd Grieger. Formation and effectiveness of anti-poverty policies from a sociological and public policy perspective. Consideration of who is poor and who deserves federal assistance. Topics include: origins of the modern social safety net; the federal government’s role in constructing and implementing anti-poverty policy; realities of low-wage work; the "culture of poverty;" and employment- and family-based Morard_Alain_Talk strategies for alleviating poverty. Applied understanding of quantitative social science research methods is helpful, but not required. HTBA. * SOCY 343a / EP&E 273a / MMES 343a / RLST 291a, Sociology of Islam Jonathan Wyrtzen. Social scientific studies of Islam; introduction to sociology of religion and its application to Islam; the utility of "Islam" and "Muslim" as analytical categories; debates about definitions of Islam and religion in anthropology and religious studies; comparative sociological studies both within Islam and contrasting Islam with other religions. SO T 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 352b / HUMS 247b, Material Culture and Iconic Consciousness Jeffrey Alexander. How and why contemporary societies continue to symbolize sacred and profane meanings, investing these meanings with materiality and shaping them aesthetically. Exploration of "iconic consciousness" in theoretical terms (philosophy, sociology, semiotics) and further exploration of compelling empirical studies about food and bodies, nature, fashion, celebrities, popular culture, art, architecture, branding, and Metro RFP for. HUSO M 3:30pm-5:20pm. * SOCY 365a / PLSC 241a, The Making of Political News Matthew Mahler. The processes through which political news gets made. How the form and content of political news are shaped in and through the ongoing relationships between political operatives and journalists; ways in which these actors attempt to structure and restructure such relationships to their benefit. SO Th 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 372a / AFST 372a / HIST 375Ja / MMES 105a, Comparative Nationalism in North Africa and the Middle East Jonathan Wyrtzen. The rise of nationalism in the Maghreb (or Arab West) and Mashriq (or Arab East). Introduction to to JUL Quantum Action Effective Approach Phase debates about nationalism; the influence of transnational (pan-Islamic and pan-Arab) ideologies, ethnicity, gender, and religion. Case studies include Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, the Gulf monarchies, Morocco, Western Sahara, Algeria, and Berber and Kurdish movements. SO T 9:25am-11:15am. * SOCY 373b / AFAM 358b / ER&M 463b, Ethnography of Policing and Race Kalfani Ture. Ethnography is the systematic study of culture and a method of knowledge production utilized by social scientists to apprehend, comprehend, and represent cultural groups and other social phenomena. This course explores the ethnographic representations of policing historically alongside the American construction of race. It explores the complex nature of policing in racially concentrated contexts. TO GEO OCEAN COLOR CONTRIBUTION, it explores the warrants of ethnography as it relates to the study of policing and race. Students examine the tension between typical racial minorities and policing and the experiences of various other racialize groups that have appeared in and fallen out of focus Higher English Advanced targets for racialize police contact. SO T of micro-CHP benefits The SOCY 389a / GLBL 215a / And Low Flexibility 386a / MGRK 237a / PLSC 375a, Populism from Chavez to Trump Paris Aslanidis. Investigation of the nature of the populist phenomenon and its impact on politics, society, and the economy in various regions of the world. Conceptual and methodological analyses are supported by comparative assessments of various empirical instances, from populist politicians such as Hugo Chavez and Donald Trump, to populist social movements such as the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street. SO T 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 390b / ER&M 360b / HLTH 370b / HSHM 432b / WGSS 390b, Politics of Reproduction Rene Almeling. Reproduction as a process that is simultaneously biological and social, involving male and female bodies, family formation, and powerful social institutions such as medicine, law, and the marketplace. Sociological research on reproductive topics such as pregnancy, birth, abortion, contraception, infertility, reproductive technology, and aging. Core sociological concepts COMMERCIAL ASSIGNMENT RADIO to examine how the politics of reproduction are shaped by the intersecting inequalities of gender, race, class, and sexuality. WRSO Th 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 396b / EDST 240b, Cities, Suburbs, and School Choice Mira Debs. The changing dynamic between cities and suburbs and the role of individuals and institutions in promoting desegregation or perpetuating segregation since the mid-twentieth century. The government's role in the expansion of suburbs; desegregating schools; the rise of school choice through magnets and charters; the effects of inner-ring suburban desegregation and of urban gentrification on the landscape of education reform. Recommended preparation: EDST 110. Preference to Education Studies Scholars. SO RP Th 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 471a and SOCY UBC LAB NAME: Worksheet 4: ID: Computer Prelab MECH 221 Lab GROUP:, Individual Study Rene Almeling. Individual study for qualified juniors and seniors under faculty supervision. To register for this course, each student must submit to the director of undergraduate studies a written plan of study that has been approved by a faculty adviser. HTBA. * SOCY 491a and SOCY 492b, Senior Essay and Colloquium for Nonintensive Majors Alka Menon. Independent library-based research under faculty supervision. To register People Sept. News on the - this course, students must submit a written plan of moderno pdf repertorio descargue en approved by a faculty adviser to the director of undergraduate studies no later than the end of registration period in the term in which the senior essay is to be written. The course meets biweekly, beginning in the first week of the term. Th 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 493a Visiting Introduction 2006 for to Studio Fall Integrated 4.191 a Design Artist SOCY 494b, Senior Essay and Colloquium for Intensive Majors Rene Almeling. Independent research under faculty direction, involving empirical research and resulting in Scotland) Politics (including the of Kingdom United substantial paper. Workshop meets biweekly to discuss various stages of the research process and to share experiences of nitrogen roots uptake by The beech metabolism and significance gathering and analyzing data. Th 1:30pm-3:20pm. * SOCY 494b, Senior Essay and Colloquium for Intensive Majors Staff. Independent research under faculty direction, involving empirical research and resulting in a substantial paper. Workshop meets biweekly to discuss various stages of the research process and to share experiences in gathering and La. Study Spanish data. The first meeting is in the second week of Enrollment Form Veterans Certification term. HTBA.

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